Trees for Life – Moringa Update

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Research continues to expand the utilization and sustainability of Moringa oleifera as a plant with amazing benefits. Trees for Life reports that in the past month three research publications continue to show the importance and diversity of the plant.   

Biosorption of Ni(II) from aqueous phase by Moringa oleifera bark,  a low cost biosorbent; D. Harikishore Kumar Reddy, D.K. V., et.al., Science Direct .

In the article abstract Moringa oleifera bark (MOB), an agricultural solid waste by-product has been developed into an effective and efficient biosorbent for the removal of Ni(II) from aqua solutions. The biosorbent was characterized by x-ray diffraction, scanning election microscopy, elemental analysis and FTIR analyases…. finding of the present study indicates that MOB can be successfully used for separation of Ni(II) aqueous solutions.

Nutritive evaluation and Effect of Moringa oleifera pod on Clastogenic Potential in the Mouse; Promkum C. Kupradinun P, Tuntipopipat S, Butryee C., PubMed.

For centuries Moringa oleifera has been consumed as a vegetable and major ingredient in healthy Thai cuisine. Previous studies have shown that Moringa pod extracts act as bifunctional inducers along with displaying antioxidant properties and also inhibiting skin papillomagenesis. This study was aimed to determine the nutritive value, and clasataogenic and anticlastogenic potentisla of Moringa oleifera pod. The study demonstrated that bMO has no clastogenicity and possesses anticlastogenic potential against clastogens, and particularly a direct-acting  in the mouse.

Foam properties and Detergent Abilities of the Saponins from Camellia oleifera; Yu-Fen Chen , et.al., International Journal of Molecular Science.

The defatted seed meal of Camellia oleifera has been used as a natural detergent and its extract is commercially utilized as a foam-stabilizing emulsifying agent. The goal of this study was to investigate the foam properties and detergent ability of the saponins from defatted seed meal. The results show that the saponins content in the defatted seed meal of C. oleifera is hight than other traditional Chinese medicines.

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9 Responses to “Trees for Life – Moringa Update”

  1. robert nicoleau Says:

    how much vitamin k is in moringa i am concerned because i take coumadin

  2. Christian Says:

    Christian…

    […]Trees for Life – Moringa Update « Trees for Life’s Moringa Blog[…]…

  3. Jatna Rivas Says:

    Anyone got the quantity of Cystine- without taking the methionine into account?

  4. it support st albans Says:

    Your style is so unique compared to other folks I have read stuff
    from. Many thanks for posting when you’ve got the opportunity, Guess I will just bookmark this page.

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